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4 edition of Shakespeare and Jonson: their reputations in the seventeenth century compared. found in the catalog.

Shakespeare and Jonson: their reputations in the seventeenth century compared.

Gerald Eades Bentley

Shakespeare and Jonson: their reputations in the seventeenth century compared.

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  • 36 Currently reading

Published by University of Chicago Press in Chicago .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Shakespeare, William, -- 1564-1616 -- Allusions,
  • Jonson, Ben, -- 1573?-1637 -- Allusions

  • Edition Notes

    First published, 1945.

    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 v. in 1.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13534761M
    OCLC/WorldCa275633


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Shakespeare and Jonson: their reputations in the seventeenth century compared. by Gerald Eades Bentley Download PDF EPUB FB2

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video An illustration of an audio speaker. Shakespeare and Jonson: their reputations in the seventeenth century, their reputations in the seventeenth century, by Pages: Shakespeare In The Seventeenth Century DAVID FROST PMt > T has long been accepted that Jonson's reputation stood higher - Add in the seventeenth century than Shakespeare's, especially since Prof.

Bentley published in I his Shakespeare and Jonson: Their Reputations in the Seventeenth Century Com. 1 Shakespeare and Jonson: Their Reputations in the Seventeenth Century Compared (2 vols.; Chicago, ), I, 2 Ibid.

3 Ibid. 4 Bentley tells us that in reaching his count he rejected large numbers of previously reported "allu-sions" which were not really allusions at all (1, ), but he does not tell us which ones; without making. John Dryden (). Shakespeare. Beaumont and Fletcher.

Ben Jonson. Vol. III. Seventeenth Century. Henry Craik, ed. English Prose. As G. Bentley notes in Shakespeare and Jonson: Their Reputations in the Seventeenth Century Compared, Jonson's reputation was in some respects equal to Shakespeare's in the 17th century. After the English theatres were reopened on the Restoration of Charles II, Jonson's work, along with Shakespeare's and Fletcher 's, formed the initial core Born: c.

11 JuneWestminster, London, England. Gerald Eades Bentley, Shakespeare and Jonson. Their Reputations in the Seventeenth Century Compared, 2 volumes (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, ).

William Blissett, Julian Patrick, and R. Van Fossen, eds., A Celebration of Ben Jonson (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, ). Jesse Franklin and Joseph Quincy Adams (eds), The Jonson Allusion Book (New Haven: Yale University Press, ), Virtually the same methodology appears in Gerald Eades Bentley’s Shakespeare and Jonson: Their Reputations in the Seventeenth Century Compared (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, ).

Google Scholar. In his own time, William Shakespeare (–) was rated as merely one among many talented playwrights and poets, but since the late 17th century has been considered the supreme playwright and poet of the English language.

No other dramatist's work has been performed even remotely as often on the world stage as Shakespeare. The plays have often been drastically adapted in performance.

Canonising Shakespeare offers the first comprehensive reassessment of Shakespeare's afterlife as a print phenomenon, demonstrating the crucial role that the book trade played in his rise to cultural pre-eminence. – was the period in which Shakespeare's canon was determined, in which the poems resumed their place alongside the plays in print, and in which artisans and named editors.

Cambridge Core - Printing and Publishing History - The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain - edited by John Barnard. Plays attributed to "W.S." during the 17th century, and not included in the First Folio.

Some plays were attributed to "W.S." in the seventeenth century. These initials could refer to Shakespeare, but could also refer to Wentworth Smith, an obscure dramatist. Locrine was published in as "Newly set forth, overseen and corrected by W.S.".

In the twentieth century, Jonson's status rose significantly. Drama. As G. Bentley compellingly argues in Shakespeare and Jonson: Their Reputations in the Seventeenth Century Compared, Jonson was more respected and more influential than Shakespeare in the. Shakespeare wrote too glibly, in Jonson’s view, mixing kings and clowns, lofty verse with vulgarity, mortals with fairies.

Seventeenth century. Jonson’s Neoclassical perspective on Shakespeare was to govern the literary criticism of the later 17th century as well. Ben Jonson and William Shakespeare were the great geniuses of early seventeenth-century English theater. Critics have long debated about the relative merits of each figure's works, some advocating that Jonson's plays show a greater range of learning and depth of examination than do those of the more famous Shakespeare.

Shakespeare and Jonson: Their Reputations in the Seventeenth Century Compared. 2 vols. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, Brooke, John Bradbury.

The Phoenix, by Thomas Middleton: A Critical, Modernized Edition. Bentley, G. Shakespeare and Jonson: Their Reputations in the Seventeenth Century Compared, vols.

Chicago []. Chute, M. Ben Jonson of Westminster. New York, In this engagingly speculative book Richard Dutton, a leading Jonson scholar, aims at putting Volpone. shakespeare and jonson; their reputations in the seventeenth century compared.

Eades Bentley, Gerald. Published by University of Chicago Press (). A COPY of Ben Jonson's Workes presently held at Yale University's Beinecke Library (shelf mark / +) contains two poems on Jonson, both presumably written by Mildmay Fane, 2nd Earl of Westmorland.

One of the poems is frequently included in standard collections of Jonson allusions; the other is not. Jonson, Ben, –, English dramatist and poet, b. Westminster, London. The high-spirited buoyancy of Jonson's plays and the brilliance of his language have earned him a rep.

Shakespeare and Jonson: Their Reputations in the Seventeenth Century Compared () Shakespeare: A Biographical Handbook () Shakespeare and His Theatre () The Profession of Dramatist in Shakespeare's Time, – () The Profession of Player in Shakespeare's Time, – () References.

The seventeenth-century stage; a collection of critical essays 16 copies. The Profession of Dramatist in Shakespeare's Time, 11 copies.

A Book of masques: in honour of Allardyce Nicoll (Introduction) 10 copies. Shakespeare and Jonson; their reputations in the seventeenth century. Shakespeare was born, brought up, and buried in Stratford-upon-Avon, where he maintained a household throughout the duration of his career in London.A market town of around 1, residents about miles ( km) north-west of London, Stratford was a centre for the slaughter, marketing, and distribution of sheep, as well as for hide tanning and wool trading.

17th-century theatre in London As Shakespeare had two purpose-built theatres at their disposal, an unusual luxury. There is a stage direction in ”Catiline His Conspiracy” by Ben Jonson. Out of that high style developed from Marlowe through Jonson (for Shakespeare does not lend himself to these genealogies) the seventeenth century separated two qualities: wit and magniloquence.

Neither is as simple or as apprehensible as its name seems to imply, and the two are not in practice antithetical; both are conscious and cultivated.

Hobsbaum, ‘Ben Jonson in the seventeenth century’, Michigan Quarterly Review, 16 (), pp. –23 Google Scholar P. Merchant, ‘A Jonson source for Herrick’s “Upon Julia’s Clothes”, Notes and Queries, (), p. 93 Google Scholar. I agree that Shakespeare's reputation was not by any means the equal of Ben Jonson's in the seventeenth century.

All the easier to believe that his identity could remain obscured, and. BEN JONSON suffered the worst fate that can overtake a creative writer. Himself a man of great talent or minor genius--his real place is on the frontier where the terms become virtually indistinguishable--he had the misfortune to live and work at the same time and in the same field as a genius acknowledged by the world as supreme--William Shakespeare.

Ben Jonson (tên đầy đủ: Benjamin Jonson, 11 tháng 6 năm – 6 tháng 8 năm ) – nhà viết kịch, nhà thơ Anh. Cùng với William Shakespeare và Christopher Marlowe, được coi là một trong những nhà viết kịch lớn nhất của thời đại Elizabeth. This brief passage outlines Shakespeare’s contemporary reputation.

He is compared to classical poets, including that “fine wag” Ovid (see items 2 and 3). In a notable nautical metaphor, he repeats an anecdote about the “wit combats” between Shakespeare and Ben Jonson (see item 38). Shakespeare made a transition from the stage to the book, which is a transition that boosted the playwright's reputation among his 18th-century critics.

InNicholas Rowe undertook the first complete edition of Shakespeare's plays for £s, which was. The love poems of the English Renaissance (late 15th–early 17th century) are considered to be some of the most romantic of all time. Many of the most famous poets are more well-known as the Elizabethan era playwrights—Christopher Marlowe (–), Ben Jonson (–), and the most renowned of all, William Shakespeare (–).

On the title page of each Folio, much is the same – the Droeshout engraving, the title, the Ben Jonson poem – you know what you’re going to get when you open a Shakespeare Folio up. When compared to the face of William Shakespeare, whether the balding, bourgeois shopkeeper of the first folio’s engraving or the bohemian sporting a piratical earring in the Chandos portrait, Jonson’s picture is largely invisible today.

Ironically, if he’s widely known for one thing, it’s predicting his competitor’s enduring popularity. Read Jonson's The Alchemist for class and just absolutely hated it.

A contemporary of Shakespeare, Jonson's reputation is well established. My professor loves this play, so I admit that some people think this work is brilliant.

I found the nonsense kept me out, rather than drew me s:   Shakespeare offers a similar interplay between fantasy and realism, between “mockeries” and “realities.”A Midsummer Night’s Dream (ca. ) is an excellent example.

The play is set in a fanciful medieval “Athens,” surrounded by an English forest. As in Chaucer’s Knight’s Tale, Theseus is “Duke of Athens,” but this altogether improbable transmogrification of a mythical. The three essays in Part ii investigate the relationship of Jonson's plays to those of a number of his seventeenth-century successors: Nathan Field and Richard Brome, 'The Playwriting Sons of Ben' (p.

69), according to the title of Cave's essay, Aphra Behn, 'an honorary Son[sic] of Ben' (p. 93), in the words of Carolyn D. Williams; and a number. In Shakespeare and Jonson, the scholar Gerald Eades Bentley set himself the task of comparing the reputations of the two in the seventeenth century.

Well into the next century Shakespeare. "The Alchemist" is more like "Volpone". The main characters are unscrupulous con-men; their targets are gullible, greedy individuals. I learned quite a bit about alchemy, at least alchemy as practiced by 17th century con-men.

As with "Volpone" and "Epicene", I was unable to predict how Ben Jonson would bring the play to a satisfactory s:   Ben Jonson, Shakespeare's slightly younger contemporary, is the earliest English author who left behind enough evidence to make a literary biography possible.

Not that the evidence is, by modern standards, voluminous. We do not know for certain when Jonson was born, who his father was or how long he went to school.

The middlebrow Pepys, a seventeenth-century Everyman, preferred entertainments with music, dancing, and a happy ending, tastes which he shared with his contemporaries, and emenders of Shakespeare at that time responded to the popular demand: the Restoration playwright James Howard wrote a version that kept the lovers alive at the end, pleasing.

THE reputation of Jonson has been of the most deadly kind that can be compelled upon the memory of a great poet. To be universally accepted; to be damned by the praise that quenches all desire to read the book; to be afflicted by the imputation of the virtues which excite the least pleasure; and to be read only by historians and antiquaries&#;this is the most perfect conspiracy of approval.In the next century, Jonson was recast as Shakespeare’s antithesis and envious rival.

The comparison turned both playwrights into caricatures: Shakespeare was elevated into a national icon through tributes to his presumably untutored art, while Jonson’s classical learning and intellect, once admired, became grounds for attacks on his pedantry.Ben Jonson is the Martin Amis of early 17th century English theater.

His prose is bloated with dense analogies and shows of learnedness that jarringly contrast with a preoccupation for criminal lowlifes and jokes about bodily secretions of both the sexy and non-sexy persuasions/5().